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Save the Date! ArtLab: Memory + Myth // March 22nd

memory-and-myth-final-wide
How much can we trust our memories? On Sunday, March 22th, ArtLab presents Memory + Myth: a live theater-infused exploration of the neuroscience of memory. The evening features original work from The Deconstructive Theatre Project–a Brooklyn-based performing arts company mixing neuroscience with multimedia–with insights into the brain from the mind of Dr. Paula Croxson.

ArtLab kicks off with an interactive experiment as Paula tests our powers of recall and introduces us to the neuroscience of how we remember. This crash course in recollection will be followed by an excerpt from the DTP’s The Orpheus Variations–a reimagining of the famous myth as a tale of the mutability of memory by blending live performance, neuroscience, and interactive technology. Rounding out the night, ArtLab will turn to the audience to delve deeper into the realm of remembrance through moderated discussion with Paula and DTP founder + director Adam J. Thompson.

Time and memory are true artists; they remould reality nearer to the heart’s desire.∇Δ John Dewey

ArtLab: Memory + Myth will begin at 6:30 pm at the Center for Performance Research and is presented as part of Brain Awareness Week, featuring brain-themed events happening across New York City.

About Our Guests

croxsonPaula Croxson is an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at the Icahn Mount Sinai School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, where she researches how memories are stored in the brain and what happens when they are compromised. Her work focuses on the complex, autobiographical life memories that are lost in aging, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. When she’s not doing science, or talking about science, she plays the flute with indie rock band Marlowe Grey.

thompsonAdam J. Thompson is the Founding Director of The Deconstructive Theatre Project and a multimedia artist and producer. For The Deconstructive Theatre Project, he has created and directed six productions, including most recently The Orpheus Variations (Magic Futurebox 2012, HERE 2013, Under the Radar 2014, Theater at the 14th Street Y 2015). Documentary footage of The Orpheus Variations was installed as a part of “Um, Nenhum, e Cem Mil,” a visual art exhibition exploring the intersections of art and science, at Edge Arts in Lisbon, Portugal between January and March 2013. He is currently developing Searching for Sebald, the second in the company’s series of live cinema events, to premiere in early 2016. Adam is a member of The Builders Association and the Associate Producer of PROTOTYPE: Opera/Theatre/Now. He has taught and guest lectured at The School of Making Thinking, Fairleigh Dickinson University, and NYU. He holds a BA in directing and dramaturgy from Emerson College in Boston.

dtpThe Deconstructive Theatre Project is a Brooklyn-based multimedia creative laboratory that is currently creating a series of works that collide live performance, neuroscience, and interactive technology. It’s most recent live cinema project, The Orpheus Variations, just completed a sold-out engagement at The Public Theater’s 2015 Under the Radar Festival followed by an encore engagement at the Theatre at the 14th Street Y in New York City. The company has been singled out for “masterfully reinventing what live theatre can mean for the individual” and as “innovatively reflective on the future of the performing arts.” To learn more visit deconstructivetheatreproject.org

Event details:

Location:

Center for Performance Research

361 Manhattan Ave.

Brooklyn, NY 11237

http://cprnyc.org

Date + Time: March 22, 2015 @ 6:30 pm
Admission:

$10, 21+
Buy advanced tickets [no fee]

Proudly Partnered with:

03.11.2014 // Music + the Mind

What music does the mind make? On March 11th, ArtLab tuned into the sound of synapses with Music + the Mind: a live music-infused experiment in neuroscience. The evening featured the Brainwave Music Project, which translates brain activity into electronic music—a project conceived by Columbia professors David Sulzer and Brad Garton.

Singer + multi-instrumentalist Lora Faye and jazz drummer William Hooker strapped on mind-reading EEG headbands to record the electrical impulses coursing through their brains, making music with their minds as they make music for the crowd. As they performed, they fed off neurofeedback, improvising to the beat of their neurons firing.

Rounding out the evening, ArtLab explored the art and neuroscience of making brainwave music through moderated discussion and active audience participation. For just a taste of the night’s conversation, enjoy the video below!

Very big thanks to Noemi Charlotte Thieves for filming the event, Josh Brechner for editing the audio, and Cameo Gallery for providing such an amazing venue.

about the guests

David Sulzer is Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center where he investigates how different parts of the brain communicate with each other. Sulzer doubles as a musician under the moniker Dave Soldier, whose work ranges from composing chamber operas in collaboration with Kurt Vonnegut to conducting a chorus of 14 elephants, known as the Thai Elephant Orchestra. [Learn more.]

Brad Garton is Director of the Computer Music Center at Columbia University where he models human musical performance on various virtual instruments, and has helped to establish computer music studios throughout the world. [Learn more.]

William Hooker’s body of uninterrupted work beginning in the mid-seventies defines him as one of the most important composers and players in jazz. As bandleader, Hooker has fielded ensembles in an incredibly diverse array of configurations. Each collaboration has brought a serious investigation of his compositional agenda and the science of the modern drum kit. As a player, Hooker has long been known for the persuasive power of his relationship with his instrument. His work is frequently grounded in a narrative context. Whether set against a silent film or anchored by a poetic theme, Hooker brings dramatic tension and human warmth to avant-garde jazz. [Learn more.]

Brooklyn native Lora Faye is a singer and multi-instrumentalist with a deep understanding of the power in the strange and idiosyncratic in American folk and rock traditions. Her songwriting and performance draws from such disparate sources as Gillian Welch and Jeff Buckley, Blind Willie Johnson and Anais Mitchell, Harry Smith and Andy Warhol. In 2012, Lora-Faye’s songwriting won her such accolades as the Grand Prize Award at NPR The Mountain Stage New Song Contest, Hudson Valley Songfest’s “Best New Artist,” and a winning slot at The New Jersey Folk Festival’s Songwriting Competition. [Learn more.]


The event was presented as part of Brain Awareness Week, which featured brain-themed events all across New York City.